Birding in Newfoundland, Canada
Brief Overview of the Trip
Day 1:  Arrival in St. John's, NL.  Flights normally arrive in
the evening, so likely no birding today.
Day 2:  Morning birding at Cape Spear. Afternoon at
Witless Bay area,
including seabird/whale boat trip.
Day 3:  Birding the La Manche Trail. Drive to Trepassey.
Day 4:  Birding the road to Cape Race in the morning. St.
Shott's
in the afternoon.
Day 5:  Cape St. Mary's Ecological Reserve. Drive to
Clarenville.
Day 6:  Birding at Terra Nova National Park.
Day 7:  Drive to St. John's for flights home.

Note:
 Please contact us prior to booking your flight, or
you may end up paying additional lodging and transfer
costs.
Brief Itinerary
Trip Description
Birding in Newfoundland
Canada
Caribou photo
by Alvan Buckley
Sooty Shearwater photo
by Alvan Buckley
Northern Gannet photo
by Alvan Buckley
Black-backed Woodpecker photo
by Bill Schmoker
Tufted Duck photo
by Alvan Buckley
Black Guillemot photo
by Alvan Buckley
For more information or to register for this trip, call Charles at 888-203-7464 or
Charles directly at 720-320-1974 or by email at
info@PIBird.com.
More Details on This Trip
A July birding trip to Newfoundland is prime time to see
large numbers of nesting seabirds, such as Northern
Gannet, Black-legged Kittiwake, Razorbill, Common Murre,
Thick-billed Murre, Black Guillemot and, a favorite of most
birders, Atlantic Puffin.  Not only will you have many
opportunities to scan for these birds from the coast, but
you will also be taking a boat trip to get even closer looks
at their nests.  While scanning the ocean from shore, it is
possible to see jaegers, shearwaters and sometimes
storm-petrels as well!  Have your camera close at hand as
you will be offered many chances for photography during
the trip.

In addition to seabirds, we will also be searching inland for
Black-backed Woodpecker, Olive-sided Flycatcher,
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, Gray Jay, Boreal Chickadee,
Pine Grosbeak and Red Crossbill.  Other land
birds to look for include Willow Ptarmigan, Hermit Thrush,
several species of warblers, including Tennessee,
Mourning, Magnolia, Blackpoll and Wilson's, Fox Sparrow,
Lincoln's Sparrow and Purple Finch.

While this is of course a birding trip, you can also expect
some interesting mammals, including Humpback Whale,
Moose, Snowshoe Hare and Caribou, with possibilities for
Minke Whale, Fin Whale, Harbor Seal, Gray Seal and Sea
Otter.

To top it all off, this is a good time of year to start looking
for some stray from Europe.  Who knows what rarity you
can add to your North America bird list!
Photo by Alvan Buckley