Winter Birding in South Carolina and Georgia
Brief Overview of the Trip
Day 1:  Arrival in Charleston, SC.  Local birding for early
arrivals.
Day 2: Coastal birding along the drive north, the rest of
the day at
Huntington Beach State Park.
Day 3:  Drive south to Savannah, GA, with birding stops en
route, including
Santee Delta, Donnelley and Bear
Island Wildlife Management Areas.
Day 4:  Savannah National Wildlife Refuge...Tybee
Island,
including a salt marsh boat trip.
Day 5: Altamaha Wildlife Management Area, Jekyll
Island, Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge.
Day 6:  Webb Wildlife Management Area and then
return to
Charleston for flights home.

Note:  Please contact us prior to booking your flight, or
you may end up paying additional lodging and transfer
costs.
Brief Itinerary
Trip Description
Winter Birding in South
Carolina and Georgia
King Rail
Photo by Bill Schmoker
Glossy Ibis
Photo by Bill Schmoker
White-eyed Vireo
Photo by Bill Schmoker
Ruddy Turnstone
Photo by Bill Schmoker
Tricolored Heron
Photo by Bill Schmoker
For more information or to register for this trip, call Charles at 888-203-7464 or
Charles directly at 720-320-1974 or by email at
info@PIBird.com.
More Details on This Trip
Any part of the Atlantic coast of the US can provide
exciting birding in winter. The coastal plain of South
Carolina and Georgia is no exception. This area offers a
chance to find birds more common farther north (Great
Cormorant, Purple Sandpiper) as well as several species
more common to the south (Black-bellied Whistling-Duck,
Common Ground-Dove). The addition of resident birds
only adds to the interesting list of target species possible
on this trip: King Rail, Red-cockaded Woodpecker, Brown-
headed Nuthatch.
Other species we will be looking for include Red-throated
Loon (sometimes dozens in one ocean view), Tundra
Swan, Anhinga, Clapper Rail, Piping Plover, Seaside
Sparrow…and up to twenty shorebird species, a dozen
types of ducks and four or five warblers, including Pine
and Orange-crowned Warblers.
Photo by David Trently
White Ibis
Photo by Bill Schmoker